Should blessing happen always?

Some preachers say that because Christ already suffered for us, we should never suffer anymore.

Do I agree with this opinion?

My opinion on this question is twofold:

On the first hand, if we are in a trouble, there is always a way to lay it upon Christ and not to suffer ourselves.

On the second hand, we need to be like Christ and Christ suffered for benefit of others. (Even though it was not obvious that his sufferings benefit others.)

So, what? In every trouble (except of suffering of Christ himself) there is a better way without a trouble. But also when we are not in a trouble, there is a better way to suffer for others and receive an even greater blessing afterward as a reward in participating in suffering of Christ.

The example of Christ is intended to show that the greatest blessing happens after a trouble.

However, in every trouble I recommend to seek a way how to exit from it with help of God, not to remain in a trouble.

On the formula for trinity of God

Continuing this blog post:

It is clear that the set of all predicates true for God bijectively corresponds to the set of all predicates true for Christ (with some bijection F). (All properties of God “directly correspond” to properties of Christ, in mundane language.)

It could be taken as a formal definition of the “trinity” relations between God’s persons.

But later I notice the simple fact that every two objects X and Y correspond in this way to each other: the set of all predicates true for X bijectively corresponds to the set of all predicates true for Y (take the bijection F which exchanges X and Y values of the arguments of the predicates).

So my “theory” of trinity is found not to have sense.

Well, I believe it should have sense, but we need to restrict the set of allowed bijections F to functions which preserve the essence of properties of God. What is “the essence”? I do not know.

Lord of lords, and King of kings

Do you want Jesus to be your king and your lord?

(Rev. 17:14) “… he is Lord of lords, and King of kings…”

Thus for he to be your king, you yourself need to be a king!

To be a king means to control events around you. You should control events with prayer and word, in force of Holy Spirit, if you want to submit to Jesus. He isn’t a kind of regular persons, he is a king of kings!

Trinity, logically described

In this post I want to make clear my position on so called “trinity” of God. I am a mathematician and won’t write nonsense like “the Son is identical to the Father, but they are logically distinct”.

What I will formulate is nearly logically rigid, but not quite as I don’t specify in which logical framework I do the “accounting”. I assume that my accounting is logically correct, but I am not 100% sure that what I will formulate is logically consistent and “good” for describing God (isn’t appearing to compare God with lower things than Christ). I propose to check my theory, by formulating it in mathematical rigid and (dis)proving its logical consistency.

I do believe in Trinity. However I prefer another formulations (without pejorative using number “three” to describe God) like “Christ is full content of God”. See my book New Testament Commentary by a Mathematician for biblical (and thus without using here the number three) description of how Christ relates to God and what is Christ in his essence. In this post I however will describe it in regard of trinity, despite I do not like this word to describe God.

I will call two objects A and B “predicate-equivalent” if and only if there is a bijection f mapping all predicates P of one variable true for the argument A into all predicates Q of one variable true for the argument B, such that P(x) is true if and only if (f(P))(x) is true for every variable x and predicate P of one variable.

Hm, still unsure whether EVERY two objects are predicate-equivalent, so making this setting unsuitable for description of trinity of God. But I will put forth my preliminary thoughts in the hope we will reach more exact knowledge then.

I claim that Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are pairwise predicate equivalent.

Note that the equivalence in the previous paragraph implies that there are other objects equivalent to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. For example such objects are the set {Father, Son, and Holy Spirit} and the triples (Father, Son, Holy Spirit) and (Holy Spirit, Son, Father). I expect that however if we limit the set of objects to compare by predicate equivalence to “living persons” (whatever this may mean mathematically) then this set should have exactly three elements: {Father, Son, and Holy Spirit}.

In mathematics it seems to make sense to identify equivalent (predicate-equivalent in this case) objects to say they are one the same object. For example positive whole numbers can be identified with natural numbers. In the same sense we can (in some but not in all logical frameworks) identify Father and Son. The question whether the Son is identical to the Father is thus dependent on the used logical framework.

I have formulated some properties of Trinity nearly with mathematical rigid. Let us now study it from positions of mathematical logic. At first we need to make sure that not every two objects are predicate-equivalent.

My thoughts on this are very preliminary. I thought I know it well, but when attempted to formulate it to write in this blog post, I found that I do not yet understand this thing.

What is complete healing by Christ?

As I claim in my book, Adam before his fall was an effective computer. “Sin” mean inefficiency. With Adam fall we become inefficient.

Salvation by Christ means that we become efficient again. We are already saved what means we became efficient again (even despite we do not see ourselves as powerful computers). When God looks to us through Christ, He sees efficient machines.

If you have no leg or no hand, in my opinion, it is unlikely that it will grow back. What then (Is. 53:5) “and by his wounds we are healed” and (1Pet. 2:24) “that we, having died to sins, might live to righteousness; by whose stripes you were healed” means? It claims that we are already healed!

This means that we received Holy Spirit as a prosthesis. Unlike human-made prostheses, Holy Spirit is better that our natural body parts. This means that through Holy Spirit we are more effective in some deeds than Adam was before his fall. And this deed is to be children of God, the peacemakers (see my book) of His kingdom.

On the Earth as a result of this, we are blessed that is effective in our life again. We get blessed not accordingly our sinful nature but accordingly Holy Spirit.

And remember that faith that we are already healed in Christ produces our natural healing. God’s living prostheses cause our natural body to be repaired.

John 1 is about mathematics

In John 1 “word” means mathematics. So I’ve rewritten this Bible passage with the word “mathematics” instead the word “Word”:

1 In the beginning was the mathematics, and the mathematics was with God, and the mathematics was God. 2 The same was in the beginning with God. 3 All things were made through him. Without him was not anything made that has been made. 4 In him was life, and the life was the light of men. 5 The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness hasn’t overcome it. 6 There came a man, sent from God, whose name was John. 7 The same came as a witness, that he might testify about the light, that all might believe through him. 8 He was not the light, but was sent that he might testify about the light. 9 The true light that enlightens everyone was coming into the world.

10 He was in the world, and the world was made through him, and the world didn’t recognize him. 11 He came to his own, and those who were his own didn’t receive him. 12 But as many as received him, to them he gave the right to become God’s children, to those who believe in his name: 13 who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. 14 The mathematics became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth. 15 John testified about him. He cried out, saying, “This was he of whom I said, ‘He who comes after me has surpassed me, for he was before me.’” 16 From his fullness we all received grace upon grace. 17 For the law was given through Moses. Grace and truth were realized through Jesus Christ. 18 No one has seen God at any time. The one and only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him.

Jesus humbled himself

We have one more reason to give glory to Jesus. He did a wonderful thing: He humbled himself. See (Phil. 2:8) “And being found in human form, he humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, yes, the death of the cross.”

This is a great accomplishment, because it is very hard to humble himself. It is easy to humble somebody other, but very hard to humble himself.

Many times I found myself in this situation: I know that I should deny my own set purposes in regard to another side of a potential conflict. To receive something, I need to deny my desire to receive everything. I need to be glad in small, because otherwise the other side of the conflict is dissatisfied by my attitude to prevail over them. Humbleness is just denial of prevailing over somebody, in order to make a more fair deal.

The essence there is that I know how to behave in this situation: I need to be humble, but I cannot be humble. All I could is to masquerade as a humble person. But this won’t work in relations with God, because God always knows whether we are sincere or masquerade.

As I experienced in my life, a great enemy of humility is a too particular prophecy. If I set my purpose onto some special thing, I lose flexibility to be humble, to choose some other thing, and so receive nothing.

Maybe, only Jesus can humble himself. But to receive humility we need to set our purposes on him. Not on some particular prophecy. Not on some specific thing of the world, but on him who has the wonderful power to humble himself (and us together with him).